By: Codanon | August 14th, 2008 |

When I first heard of eRepublik, I was curious. It claimed to be a browser-politics-SecondLife mix. It did not sound bad. I went to the site to register and instead found this…

Yeah, 538 people waiting to play this game. The first thought that came through my mind was “This game has to be GREAT!”. So I signed up and waited patiently for my invite. After a month and a half, the invite arrived. I had already forgotten about the game but was eager to try it out.

First Look: When you first sign up for an invite, you can pick what country/region you want to join, but it means nothing as you have to pick again when you get the invite and actually register. You start in your picked country/state and if it isn’t a popular region, there won’t be many people in your town to interact with. I picked the USA for country and Montana for the state. From there, I was assigned to the city of Helena, which has a population of 9. Some regions like New York City have a population of over 200. Others, like Spain, have regions with 500 citizens. But don’t pay much attention to the region you select as you can move later on.

First Impressions: There isn’t much to do. When you first start, all you can do is join the military, and make a CV (portfolio, resume) so you may get a job. Depending on how much salary you ask for, you get a job offer from one of the user-owned companies. Depending on how often you work, you get raises as you level up. Later on, you can even create your own company. Another option is to join the military and take part of the wars in the game. I haven’t been part of one yet so can’t say much about that.

Daily Tasks: There are several things you can do everyday. You can work, do military training, check your food inventory, and vote. All these only require a click of the mouse so it won’t take long. Another thing you can do is invite friends. They claim you get gold when you do so, but I invited a friend who then joined, but I never got any gold, despite emailing them twice about it. Another aspect of the game is the media. You can write articles about in-game politics which is supposed to be interesting. It’s not.

Conclusion: This isn’t a game that will take much of your day. It will barely take a minute, if that. In fact, there isn’t much of a reason to join. You might want to join if you’re bored, in which case, don’t. But if you insist, leave a message on the comments with your email address and we’ll send you an invite. And by the way, that 538 people waiting message has not changed…yet.

Rating 9/20

[ Graphics | 2 ]
[ Gameplay | 2 ]
[ Through | 3 ]
[ Fun Factor | 2 ]

Play it Here